Missing dll error solution

Missing dll error solution

Please read the instructions carefully before you download the dll file.Take the proper steps to safely clean and repair windows errors.

1. Before you start the DLL installation, Repair Windows Errors and Prevent Crashing or Freezing with FREE PCFix.
2. After you download "*.Dll"(file extension dll) on your machine, copy it to
windows/system32/
3. Go to "start" ==> "run" and type "regsvr32 *.dll" to register the file to the system. 32 or 64 bit,no dlls is corrup!

Where should this file go?
Please copy it to windows/system32/


    
Print E-mail

Dynamic-link library (also written without the hyphen), or DLL, is Microsoft's implementation of the shared library concept in the Microsoft Windows and OS/2 operating systems. These libraries usually have the file extension DLL, OCX (for libraries containing ActiveX controls), or DRV (for legacy system drivers).

The file formats for DLLs are the same as for Windows EXE files — that is, Portable Executable (PE) for 32-bit Windows, and New Executable (NE) for 16-bit Windows. As with EXEs, DLLs can contain code, data, and resources, in any combination.

In the broader sense of the term, any data file with the same file format can be called a resource DLL. Examples of such DLLs include icon libraries, sometimes having the extension ICL, and font files, having the extensions FON and FOT.

Dynamic-link library (also written without the hyphen), or DLL, is Microsoft's implementation of the shared library concept in the Microsoft Windows and OS/2 operating systems. These libraries usually have the file extension DLL, OCX (for libraries containing ActiveX controls), or DRV (for legacy system drivers).

The file formats for DLLs are the same as for Windows EXE files — that is, Portable Executable (PE) for 32-bit Windows, and New Executable (NE) for 16-bit Windows. As with EXEs, DLLs can contain code, data, and resources, in any combination.

In the broader sense of the term, any data file with the same file format can be called a resource DLL. Examples of such DLLs include icon libraries, sometimes having the extension ICL, and font files, having the extensions FON and FOT.

Background

The original purpose for DLLs was saving both disk space and memory required for applications by storing it locally on the hard drive. In a conventional non-shared library, sections of code are simply added to the calling program; if two programs use the same routine, the code has to be included in both. Instead, code which multiple applications share can be separated into a DLL which only exists as a single, separate file, loaded only once into memory during usage. Extensive use of DLLs allowed early versions of Windows to work under tight memory conditions.

DLLs provide the standard benefits of shared libraries, such as modularity. Modularity allows changes to be made to code and data in a single self-contained DLL shared by several applications without any change to the applications themselves. This basic form of modularity allows for relatively compact patches and service packs for large applications, such as Microsoft Office, Microsoft Visual Studio, and even Microsoft Windows itself.

Another benefit of the modularity is the use of generic interfaces for plug-ins. A single interface may be developed which allows old as well as new modules to be integrated seamlessly at run-time into pre-existing applications, without any modification to the application itself. This concept of dynamic extensibility is taken to the extreme with ActiveX.

While DLLs provide many benefits, they have a number of drawbacks, collectively called "DLL hell". Currently, Microsoft .NET is promoted as a solution to the problems of DLL hell.

Import libraries

Linking to dynamic libraries is usually handled by linking to an import library when building or linking to create an executable file. The created executable then contains an import address table (IAT) to which all dll function calls are referenced (each referenced dll function contains its own entry in the IAT). At run-time, the IAT is filled with appropriate addresses that point directly to a function in the separately-loaded dll.

Like static libraries, import libraries for DLLs are noted by the .lib file extension. For example, kernel32.dll, the primary dynamic library for Windows' base functions such as file creation and memory management, is linked to via kernel32.lib...

 
< Prev



Popular Dlls:

Need Help? Find us at facebook

Customer Support

Got computer error message "dll not found" or "bad image" or "error loading" or "was not found" or "the procedure entry point" or "could not be located" or "Access Violation" or "Cannot register" at startup or shutdown or run program?
No "missing dll" anymore - Repair dll errors - How to fix windows dll corrupt on your windows xp,vista,2000/2003,win7, win8,win10